State Theatre Portland
Third Eye Blind & Jimmy Eat World – Summer Gods Tour 2019

State Theatre presents

Third Eye Blind & Jimmy Eat World – Summer Gods Tour 2019

Ra Ra Riot

Sat, July 6, 2019

Doors: 5:00 pm / Show: 6:00 pm

Thompson’s Point

Portland, ME

$45 Advance / $50 Day of Show

This event is all ages

Everything you need to know about Thompson’s Point CLICK HERE

Thompson’s Point has limited on-site parking available (but it’s within walking & biking distance from downtown Portland!) CLICK HERE TO BUY PARKING

Buy tickets in person at the Port City Music Hall box office (504 Congress Street) Wednesday-Friday 10AM-5PM, charge by phone at 800-745-3000, or online right here. Thompson's Point box office will open at 3PM day of show.

Third Eye Blind
Third Eye Blind
Since 1997, San Francisco's Third Eye Blind have recorded four best-selling albums and assembled one career retrospective.  3EB recently released “the 20th Anniversary edition of their 7 million selling self-titled debut. “ Led by Stephan Jenkins, 3EB won wide success during a tumultuous group of years when the major-label recording industry was finally losing its grip on an enterprise that for decades it had dominated with steely efficiency.  Nothing could have made 3EB happier!  3EB, however, have experienced no comparable loss.  Instead, they have gained artistic clarification -- and, surprisingly, a fan base who is larger, younger and more dedicated than ever. Participation in the older, untouchable realm of nervous star-making could color a band's identity.  In the case of 3EB, it often blurred the perception of their brilliant musical creations. In recent years, those creations have recast the band among a current generation of fans. 3EB now write, tour, record, and communicate in a fluid new world where their music continues naturally to evolve.  Their exchange with their audience is unfiltered and being from the hub of tech, they are using it to develop a closer exchange with their audience. After a stunning festival run in 2016 with appearances at Lollapalooza, Outside Lands, Bumbershoot, Bonnaroo and many others, they completed a fantastic 20th Anniversary celebration in Summer 2017 and are currently touring theatres this Fall. A new record is expected in 2018.
Jimmy Eat World
Jimmy Eat World
Before Jimmy Eat World entered the studio to record their ninth full-length album, Integrity Blues [RCA], the members of the multiplatinum Mesa, AZ rock band did something they’ve never done in over two decades.

“We took a little break,” smiles lead singer and guitarist Jim Adkins.

Adkins released a series of 7” & embarked on his first worldwide solo tour, Lind released an EP and toured with his wife in The Wretched Desert, Linton took up boxing, and Burch opened up CaskWerks Distillery in Arizona.

When the band reconvened in November 2015, they teamed up with producer Justin Meldal-Johnsen [Paramore, M83] and began sifting through ideas.

“I came to a realization,” admits Adkins. “In the break, writing was a little trickier. I wanted to change things up. So, instead of writing about a problem, I wanted to write about a solution. If you look at your life for what’s going wrong, it won’t be too hard to find things. If you start looking at what you have rather than what you’re missing out on, you come away from things with a much different perspective that’s a lot more grateful and positive. As an album, Integrity Blues is about trying to overcome that personal struggle instead of getting upset with what life could be that it isn’t.”

They recorded in Los Angeles with Meldal-Johnsen, offering a different setting from their usual Arizona digs.

“We became willing to throw away our default responses to everything and search for the best answers rather than relying on what was familiar or comfortable. When you’re younger and you make music, you do it for discovery. Being in this for a long time, it’s about throwing out all of your expectations and comforts and seeing what you can do without them.”

With warm production and a powerful upbeat groove, Integrity Blues first single “Sure and Certain” pairs a buzzing guitar hum with an unshakable chant.
“It’s about the idea of having blinders on for what you want to do and achieve,” the frontman explains. “Since you’re so laser focused on what you think you want, you’re missing out on everything around you. It can be a very limiting way to go about life.”

Meanwhile, the gorgeously minimal title track “Integrity Blues” tempers orchestral, cinematic overtones with a stark and striking vocal performance.
After a successful 10th anniversary tour revisiting Futures, the musicians briefly went their separate ways at the end of 2014.

“It was a song I wrote on the solo tour,” he recalls. “Sometimes, the idea of walking your path the best you can feels like lonely work. The only way out is action. Feelings of being in a dark place are actually growth opportunities. It’s emotional jiu-jitsu to shift your perspective into seeing it that way.”

Elsewhere on the record, “Get Right” snaps into an energetic refrain, while “Through” serves up one of the band’s hookiest moments to date.

“You Are Free” flaunts one of the group’s most hummable and heartfelt refrains, serving as another high watermark. “It Matters” illuminates the band’s diverse sonic palette and covers what Adkins describes as “a central theme about the idea that a sense of comfort comes from within and not just external validation.”

“Pass The Baby” builds from a delicate heartbeat-style click into a deliberate and distorted explosion. Near seven-minute closer “Pol Roger” carves out an emotional and entrancing climax encased in a rapture of guitars and vocals, which according to Adkins, “Felt like the right way to sum everything up.”

Surveying the journey thus far, Adkins maintains the same passion he did on day one, and it continues to fuel Jimmy Eat World. “I’ve wanted to play music since second grade, and here I am playing music. It’s something we’re immensely grateful for. That’s why we don’t take it lightly. We want to be in a constant state of progress. You have to move forward in a way that’s challenging and evolving.”

“At the end of the day, you have to be proud of your own work,” he leaves off. “We are. If you breathe that in and believe it, you’ve won.”
Ra Ra Riot
Ra Ra Riot
Ra Ra Riot first met seven years ago while attending school in Syracuse, New York, and quickly graduated from basement rehearsals and student dance parties to blog buzz and press acclaim for their debut The Rhumb Line. After extensive touring for their meticulously recorded second record The Orchard and some membership changes, Ra Ra Riot decided to mix things up for their album Beta Love, leaving upstate New York for Sweet Tea, the Oxford, MS studio of producer Dennis Herring (Modest Mouse/Elvis Costello/Wavves).

Herring pushed singer Wes Miles, guitarist Milo Bonacci, bassist Mathieu Santos and violinist Rebecca Zeller to embrace spontaneity and rethink their roles. The band recreated themselves on Beta Love, a collection of giddy pop songs and heady lyrics that pull inspiration from futurist Ray Kurzweil, among others.
Venue Information:
Thompson’s Point
1 Thompson's Point
Portland, ME, 04102