State Theatre Portland
Martin Sexton

WCLZ Presents

Martin Sexton

The Alternate Routes

Fri, January 25, 2013

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

State Theatre

Portland, ME

$30, $25 - Reserved

This event is all ages

Buy tickets in person at the Cumberland County Civic Center Box Office, charge by phone at 800-745-3000 and online at www.statetheatreportland.com The State Theatre Box Office will be open one hour before doors on night of show.

Martin Sexton
Martin Sexton
Fall Like Rain, Martin Sexton's brand-new EP, finds this artist again asking relevant questions and challenging the status quo. Entertaining us all the while, he continues to call for unity in "One Voice Together" and adds: "In a world of warfare, peace is bad for business . . ." A timely cover of Buffalo Springfield's "For What It's Worth" reminds us it's time to "stop, hey, what's that sound, everybody look what's going down." On this record, the artist subtly and seamlessly blends infectious tunes with a powerful message.
His "soul-marinated voice" (Rolling Stone) shimmers on the soaring falsetto on the title track: "I wanna feel, I wanna fall like rain, without the shelter, so I can see which way the wind is blowin' today."
Why an EP? Sexton says, "These songs are relevant today and I didn't want to wait to release a full-length album. And in a down economy, we're getting new music to people for the price of a soy latte."
A native of Syracuse, N.Y., and the tenth of 12 children, Martin Sexton grew up in the '80s. Uninterested in the music of the day, he fueled his dreams with the timeless sounds of classic rock 'n' roll. As he discovered the dusty old vinyl left in the basement by one his big brothers, his musical fire was lit. Sexton eventually migrated to Boston, where he began to build a following singing on the streets of Harvard Square, gradually working his way through the scene. His 1992 collection of self-produced demo recordings, In the Journey, was recorded on an old 8-track in a friend's attic. He managed to sell 20,000 copies out of his guitar case.
From 1996 to 2002 Sexton released Black Sheep, The American, Wonder Bar and Live Wide Open. The activity and worldwide touring behind these records laid the foundation for the career he enjoys today with an uncommonly loyal fan base; he sells out venues from New York's Nokia Theatre to L.A.'s House of Blues, and tours regularly across Canada and Europe.
Happily and fiercely independent, Martin Sexton launched his own label, KTR, in 2002. Since then he has infiltrated many musical worlds, performing at concerts ranging from pop (collaborating with John Mayer) to the Jam scene to classic rock (collaborating with Peter Frampton); from the Newport Folk Fest to Bonnaroo to New Orleans Jazz Fest to a performance at Carnegie Hall.
Regardless of his reputation as a musician's musician, Sexton can't keep Hollywood away. His songs can be heard in many feature films and television including NBC's Scrubs, Parenthood and Showtime's hit series Brotherhood.
Stage, film and television aside, when Sexton isn't touring he often mixes entertainment with his sense of social responsibility, performing at benefits for Paul Newman's Hole in the Wall Gang camp, the Children's Tumor Foundation, Japan earthquake/tsunami relief (The John Lennon Tribute), and Hurricane Irene relief efforts in Vermont, to name some.
In 2007 Sexton began his most successful years to date with the release of his studio offering Seeds. The album debuted at #6 on Billboard's Heatseekers chart, and the Los Angeles Times said, "Call him a soul shouter, a road poet, a folkie or a rocker and you wouldn't be wrong."
The live CD/DVD set Solo, which includes a DVD of his performance at Denver's Mile High Festival, followed in 2008.
In 2010 the album Sugarcoating found this one-of-a-kind-troubadour doing what he does best: locating larger truths. After hearing it, NBC anchor Brian Williams sought Martin out to sit down for an interview backstage at New York's Beacon Theatre. It's now featured on MSNBC's BriTunes.
The accolades continue. Billboard called Sexton's version of "Working Class Hero" for the Lennon tribute/benefit in 2010 "chill-inspiring." Released this November as part of The 30th Annual John Lennon Tribute album, the track is available on iTunes.
The New York Times noted that this artist "jumps beyond standard fare on the strength of his voice, a blue-eyed soul man's supple instrument," adding, "his unpretentious heartiness helps him focus on every soul singer's goal: to amplify the sound of the ordinary heart."
Billboard called Sexton "The real thing, people, a star with potential to permanently affect the musical landscape and keep us entertained for years to come."
The Alternate Routes
The Alternate Routes
The Alternate Routes’ name suits them well. They’re a band that‘s never really fit in — in a good way. Without a definitive genre to reference or an established scene to rally behind them, they’ve been something of a rogue wave in an ocean of bands. They built a fan base the old fashioned way, by driving around the country in a big, white Ford Econoline van, winning crowds over one person-at-a-time with solid, catchy songs and an explosive live show. Since their genesis in 2004, cofounders Tim Warren (vocals, acoustic guitar) and Eric Donnelly (lead guitar) have taken their group through the dizzying heights and frustrating lows of the modern music industry, and have learned some valuable lessons along the way.
The culmination of all these experiences to date is a new record called Lately that exemplifies the new focus and attitude of a band that knows who they are and what they want. Produced by Teddy Morgan at The Bario East in Nashville, Tenn., the Routes’ updated sound on Lately is more spontaneous and raw than what we’ve heard from them in the past, but it retains the melody, depth and power of their previous efforts. This less-glossy version of the band is more true to the no-holds-barred, uplifting live show that put them on the map in the first place.
As road warriors of the 21st century, the band’s experiences are numerous and varied. They’re known for staying after the club ‘til last call, playing fan requests in the parking lot after the show on acoustic guitars. They’ve been the musical guest on Late Night with Conan O’Brien, opened a tour for O.A.R. to college-age crowds at arenas and drank moonshine out of a mason jar, jamming with the Mountain Stage house band in Charleston, West Virginia (following their taping of the down-home, nationally-syndicated radio show). But they’ve also hosted Patty Griffin in the studio to sing delicate background vocals on a track and have played fully acoustic shows at dinner theaters across the country to standing ovations.
They’ve got tear-jerking ballads, in-your-face rock anthems, bizarre, experimental songs, campfire sing-alongs, futuristic space jams — it’s all fair game. On their previous album A Sucker’s Dream, radio stations spun nine different songs, each one appealing to a different format and demographic. They’re a hard band to label, but an easy one to like.
Venue Information:
State Theatre
609 Congress St
Portland, ME, 04101
http://www.statetheatreportland.com/