State Theatre Portland
Dinosaur Jr.

Dinosaur Jr.

Hush Arbors

Thu, November 29, 2012

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

State Theatre

Portland, ME

$25 advance / $28 day of show

This event is all ages

Buy tickets in person at the Cumberland County Civic Center Box Office, charge by phone at 800-745-3000 and online at www.statetheatreportland.com The State Theatre Box Office will be open one hour before doors on night of show.

Dinosaur Jr.
Dinosaur Jr.
Although always as loud as god, it was easy to convince yourself the music of Dinosaur Jr was far more passive than aggressive. This myth exploded in a hail of flaming toads in the spring of 1989, when the band’s original trio line-up burst like a ripe sac of pus. In the intervening years there have been various versions of Dinosaur Jr, several of which made use of ur-drummer, Murph; but none of them included prodigal bassist, Lou Barlow. Until now. Until Beyond.

There was a sense that some all-new form of togetherness might happen when J and Lou’s old band, Deep Wound, played a short reunion “set” at a benefit Sonic Youth headlined in Northampton, Massachusetts. For all the acrimony that was predicted to hang over the proceedings, Deep Wound’s set was pretty mellow – for a hardcore band, anyway – and, since reissues of their first three albums were in the works, the possibility of a Dino reunion was something that seemed surprisingly imaginable all of a sudden.

Every Dinosaur Jr album has its share of great songs, but there was something almost holy about that first trinity and the band that created them. It’s true this piece began by calling them passive, but most fans knew it was only their surface that was placid. At its best, the trio’s music (its guts) was like a version of the Stooges that didn’t have Iggy – just one of the Ashetons mumbling vocals while they all slugged the crap out of their instruments. Dino Jr’s sound was actually a roiling sea of emotion and rage and a sense of aggro that had been forged into a bizarre metal-punk-pop-whatsis by obsessive listening to Sabbath, the Birthday Party, The Cure, Blitz and Neil Young. Do you remember that Little Rascals film where Alfala eats a hot dog and a hamburger immediately before he gets into a boxing match? An animated hot dog and hamburger get into a boxing match in his stomach. Well, Dinosaur Jr’s influences were like that – except it was more like a Texas Cage Match where Neil and Nick yanked on each other’s hair while Nidge and Robert and Ozzy threw buckets of boiling urine into everybody’s eyes.
Hush Arbors
Hush Arbors
Keith Wood (the man behind Hush Arbors), "has a poet's soul and a drifter's mentality. Better than most, he understands the similarities between Ted Berrigan and The Byrds," says friend Matt Krefting. "He's put the hours in playing with Six Organs of Admittance, Sunburned Hand of the Man, Current 93, and Thurston Moore, and is equally at home in the wilds of improvisation as he is with the vast possibilities of song form. As adept as he is at playing with others, Hush Arbors is all his, and it's what he does best. His records for Ecstatic Peace, Hush Arbors and Yankee Reality, demonstrate Keith's extraordinary capacity to mold songs of haunting beauty and sweetness, songs that make sense around the fireplace or on the open road. These new songs continue that trajectory and intensify the emotional gravitas of his previous work. They are like a re-awaking, a groggy hello to a forgotten world, or a blissful hangover full of melancholy love and beautiful promise."
Venue Information:
State Theatre
609 Congress St
Portland, ME, 04101
http://www.statetheatreportland.com/