State Theatre Portland
Mumford & Sons, Eastern Promenade

GENTLEMEN OF THE ROAD PRESENTS THE PORTLAND STOPOVER with

Mumford & Sons

Eastern Promenade

Dropkick Murphys, St. Vincent, Dawes, Maccabees, the Apache Relay, Haim, Reggie Watts as Emcee

Sat, August 4, 2012

Doors: 12:00 pm / Show: 2:00 pm

Eastern Promenade

Portland, Maine

$69

Sold Out

This event is all ages

The Box Office and will call willl be located on the Eastern Promenade, in between Moody and Wilson Streets. Box Office will open at 11am on August 4 and will remain open for the duration of the concert. Valid photo ID is required to pick up will call tickets. The Eastern Promenade is a 68-acre grassy reserve sloping down to the peaceful waters and islands of Casco Bay. The park is located on the East End of Portland in the Munjoy Hill Neighborhood. Gates for the August 4th concert will open at Noon and music will start at 2pm. Day of show Box Office and Will Call will be located at the main entrance where Wilson Street meets the Eastern Promenade. Box Office will open at 11am day of show. Parking is limited, so please carpool, bike or walk. No lawn chairs, pets, bottles, cans, glass, coolers, food, drinks, alcoholic beverages or fireworks. This is a no smoking venue per Maine state law. Dates, times & artists subject to change.

Mumford & Sons
Mumford & Sons
Portland, Maine: Lighthouses. Lobster traps. Grizzled dudes with manly beards setting sail at ungodly hours in the freezing cold. What better place to begin an American adventure than New England?

The Stopovers combine the intimacy of a community celebration with the excitement of a world-class music festival. Featuring local vendors and activities, each Stopover will begin with a concert at a unique site and end with a series of smaller events involving local businesses, venues, and, most importantly, local people. Mumford & Sons will headline the main event, alongside an eclectic and energetic roster of artists curated by the band themselves.

These one-day, outdoor events will take place in four carefully-selected and unique locations across America, including the Eastern Promenade in Portland, ME; downtown Bristol, VA/TN; Page Park in Dixon, IL; and the legendary Fairgrounds in Monterey, CA.

Tickets go on sale June 1 at 10am EST, exclusively at www.gentlemenoftheroad.com or by calling 1-800-512-SHOW.

Tickets to the Stopovers will be $69, with no additional service fees or hidden charges. A very limited quantity of $59 tickets with no additional fees or charges will be available beginning June 1 for the Portland concert on a first-come, first-served basis. These tickets will sell out so please plan accordingly.

Each ticket will include a beautifully designed commemorative passport ticket, and an exclusive compilation album featuring performances taken from across the four shows.
Eastern Promenade
Eastern Promenade
The Eastern Promenade is a 68-acre grassy reserve sloping down to the peaceful waters and islands of Casco Bay. The picturesque New England views here are some of the most beautiful in the world. The park is located on the East End of Portland in the Munjoy Hill Neighborhood.
Dropkick Murphys
Dropkick Murphys
On their seventh full-length studio album, Going Out In Style, Dropkick Murphys throw a new kind of party. It’s a raucous and rollicking romp overflowing with punk rock energy, folk soul, and Irish spirit. Fueled by fiery riffs and unforgettable choruses, Going Out In Style traces the journey of Cornelius Larkin, whether it’s the Irish immigrant’s first person account of his own wake or the band’s in depth interpretation of his life and lineage throughout the album’s lyrics, it’s the party to end all parties.

Dropkick Murphys have many reasons to celebrate. Since they first hit the scene in 1996, the Boston seven-piece have racked up record sales in excess of 3 million worldwide. Their smash hit single “I’m Shipping Up to Boston” exceeded platinum status and was featured in Martin Scorsese’s Academy Award-winning film, The Departed. Their 2007 offering, The Meanest of Times, debuted in the Billboard Top 20, marking the band’s highest chart entry to date and heralding the formal arrival of their independent label Born & Bred Records. The band has sold out shows worldwide and cultivated one of the most fervent fan bases in rock music. They even penned the theme song to the first Red Sox World Series win in 86 years. Going Out In Style, their latest on Born & Bred Records, is an opus that’s both explosive and endearing.
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
It starts with the creation myth: St. Vincent, naked and alone in the wilderness, startled as the ominous rattle of a snake breaks the silence of her Eden. She realizes she’s not alone in the world and breaks into a run, headed towards the uncertainty of the future. It’s a lovely and appropriate metaphor to open St. Vincent’s self-titled fourth album, except that it literally happened.
“It’s not a metaphor at all,” St. Vincent, aka Annie Clark, says of the album’s lead track, “Rattlesnake.” While visiting a friend’s west Texas ranch, she decided to strip away her clothes and fully enjoy the solitude that city life so rarely affords. “I went walking around this great expanse of land. There was no one around so I decided to take my clothes off and immerse myself in nature. I saw holes in the path, but did not put two-and-two together until I heard the rattle and caught a glimpse of the snake.”

Clark’s been moving at a breakneck speed for the past two years, barely stopping to catch her breath amidst a whirlwind of recording and touring. In 2011 she released her third album, ‘Strange Mercy,’ called “one of the year’s best” by the New York Times and “something to behold” by Pitchfork. The record cemented her status as one of her generation’s most fearsome and inventive guitarists, earned her the covers of SPIN, Paper, and Under the Radar, performances everywhere from the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Fallon to Letterman and Conan, and a year-long sold-out tour of her biggest venues to date around the world. She appeared on the hit IFC series Portlandia and graced the pages of Vogue’s coveted September issue. It was during this already monumentally busy time that she completed work with David Byrne on their collaborative album ‘Love This Giant,’ another critical smash that was dubbed “marvelous” by the New Yorker and “magical” by NPR.

“I finished the ‘Strange Mercy’ tour in Japan and went directly into ‘Love This Giant’ rehearsals and the subsequent North American tour,” says Clark.

At the end of it all, Clark made it clear to everyone in her life, in no uncertain terms, that she needed two weeks to decompress and readjust to life off the road. Time without interruption, without thoughts of albums or tours or festivals or studios. “36 hours later I sent everyone an email saying, ‘I’m ready to go again,’” Clark laughs. “I began writing music.”
Those songs turned into her most lyrically sophisticated and musically diverse collection to date, meshing distorted, aggressive electric guitars and bold vocal and synthesizer arrangements on top of a relentless rhythm section.

“I wanted the groove to be paramount,” Clark says of the album, which she arranged and demoed extensively in Austin before heading into the studio in Dallas to record. She enlisted Dap-Kings drummer Homer Steinweiss and frequent collaborator McKenzie Smith of Midlake to share drum duties, while she returned to producer John Congleton to take the sonic potential they’d only just begun to tap with ‘Strange Mercy’ into dramatic new territory. “I wanted to make a party record you could play at a funeral.”

The result is Clark’s most gripping work to date. “Bring Me Your Loves” is a frenzied freakout, but even less frantic tracks like “Severed Crossed Fingers” still deliver her trademark blend of the beautiful and surreal. At the heart of all her music, though, lie larger questions about what it means to be human and the ways in which we seek to create meaning in our lives.
“Regret” catches her at a moment of immense vulnerability, while “I Prefer Your Love” may be the purest expression of affection she’s ever written. “Digital Witness” tackles identity in the era of Instagram, with Clark singing, “If I can’t show it / If you can’t see me / What’s the point of doing anything”

“We are inundated with technology that makes us perpetual spectators,” says Clark. “It’s not enough to just experience life, we have to document it and show it to other people in order to validate our existence.” Clark is quick to admit that she, too, at times falls victim to the impulse, which is part of what fascinates her so much with the idea. “Lyrically, I’m always so interested in how complicated people are and the notion of true ambivalence,” she says. “Literally, ambi-valence. Two ways at the same time.”

Such is the music on ‘St. Vincent’: charming and alarming, gorgeous and morbid, comforting and uncanny. Four albums into one of music’s most compelling careers, Annie Clark is as “ambi-valent” as ever, and she’s not slowing down any time soon.
Dawes
Dawes
While the city of Los Angeles has been both an inspiration and a home to the four members of Dawes, they found themselves traveling East last fall to record their third album in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina with newly enlisted producer Jacquire King. It was a chance to hunker down and work each day for a month away from familiar landmarks and routines. The tracks they laid down at Asheville’s Echo Mountain Studio have yielded a 12-song disc of tremendous sonic and narrative clarity, book-ended in classic album fashion by two very different versions of the wistful “Just Beneath The Surface” – a misleading title, really, since the songs stacked in between dig so deep. Stories Don’t End is not so much a departure from the quartet’s previous efforts as a distillation of them. It spotlights the group’s maturing skills as arrangers, performers and interpreters who shape the raw material supplied by chief songwriter and lead vocalist Taylor Goldsmith into an artfully concise and increasingly soulful sound.
Once again, Goldsmith displays a particular gift for tunes that balance tough and tender, hardboiled and heartbroken. As a writer, he prowls his psyche like a forties detective, looking for clues to the mysteries of life and love. “Just My Luck” has the irresistible pull of a vintage country tune, though the arrangement is understated and contemporary. If Goldsmith’s vocal delivery weren’t plaintive enough, the band ups the emotional ante with a beautiful wordless coda that intertwines Tay Strathairn’s piano and Goldsmith’s lead guitar. Similarly “Something In Common” is a morning-after shuffle that builds into a bigger and more dramatic track before dropping back to a quiet melancholic finish. Goldsmith takes a few simple words, like “something in common,” and uses them like chapter headings to develop a compelling story, full of unexpected twists, from verse to verse. “Someone Will” includes the same kind of word play while boasting a little more swagger. “Hey Lover,” a cover of a tongue-in-cheek tune by Dawes’ good buddy Blake Mills, is a playful mid-album break with Taylor Goldsmith and his young brother, drummer Griffin Goldsmith, trading off lead vocals.
Before he started composing for the album, says Taylor, “I went through a Joan Didion tear.” It was right after he read the legendary author’s Democracy that he found the title, Stories Don’t End, in her work. Though Didion is currently a New Yorker, she is most associated with Southern California, its culture of the sixties and seventies, a subject she examined in gimlet-eyed prose. When Goldsmith started penning new songs after several months on the road in support of Dawes’ 2011 disc, Nothing Is Wrong, his writing was even more keenly observant. “From a Window Seat” was the first he completed and, he admits, “It’s a very singular song. A lot of the songs on the record can be a little more broad, about a period in someone’s life or trying to explore a certain feeling. This song is about a specific experience of being on an airplane and that’s not a very poetic or lyrical idea.” Yet Goldsmith, employing an accumulation of small details, once again finds the bigger picture, about the narrator’s past and his (and our) uncertain future, about the history lurking beneath the swimming pool-dotted landscape below him. Just as important is the track itself—lean, propulsive and guitar-driven – lending urgency to Goldsmith’s in-flight musings. Similarly, “Bear Witness,” a last-minute addition to the lineup that the band arranged during the Asheville sessions, is an almost cinematically vivid rendering of a man having a conversation with his child from his hospital bed.
Nothing Is Wrong had garnered considerable acclaim, with London’s Independent declaring, “It’s as close to a perfect Americana album as there’s been this year.” Up to then, the band had relied on good friend Jonathan Wilson as producer, cutting its 2009 debut disc, North Hills, at Wilson’s Laurel Canyon studio and its follow-up with Wilson at a larger room in Echo Park. But Wilson’s own career as a solo artist was taking off following the release of his Gentle Spirit disc, and the band began a search for a new collaborator. King boasted an impressive and unusual resume, having produced an eclectic range of artists, including Kings of Leon, Modest Mouse, Norah Jones and the Punch Brothers. Says keyboardist Strathairn, “He’s really easy to work with. As a producer he doesn’t want to be the artist, he simply tries to make the band sound the best that the band can be. And the work speaks for itself.”
Recording with King and foregoing the quickly cut, straight-to-analog tape approach of its first two recordings was a way, says Taylor, for Dawes “to push the boundaries of what might be expected of us, or feel like a comfort zone for us, while trying to be the same band we always are. That was important to us. We didn’t want to abandon anybody’s sense of who we were and, more importantly, our sense of ourselves. We wanted to stay true to this thing that we had while starting to widen the spectrum a little bit.”
The reprise of “Just Beneath the Surface” at the end of the disc, however, is a first-take document of the band figuring out the tune together, and it was too good not to keep. As bassist Wylie Gelber recalls, “We knew the vibe we were going for and we were running through it while Jacquire was setting up. But we were completely unaware that he was recording us. We were fooling around and towards the end of it, we stopped for a minute and Jacquire said, Hey man, I think we’ve got it. We tried to beat that take but we couldn’t. You can hear it there, you can feel that it’s the first time it’s being played, it’s a simple song and there’s a subtle art to doing it. It ebbs and flows.”
“With Jacquire,” explains Taylor, “we were able to hold on to an essence of what we had been, but I feel now, more than with our first two records, that this makes a case that we’re a band from 2013. There a lot of bands that harken back to a period or style of a different time and that can be really limiting. That was never our intention.”
“The album is very honest,” concludes Strathairn. “It’s us.”
Maccabees
Maccabees
the Apache Relay
the Apache Relay
The Apache Relay takes more long car rides than most bands. But only a portion of their car time is dedicated to their touring schedule — the rest is something like driving in the middle of the night from Nashville to Alabama and back, just to listen to a new record 12 consecutive times. Despite their wagon's sketchy brakes, this happens a lot. It's where the indie-roots band discovered a shared love for the timelessness of Motown records, the weight of Springsteen's Nebraska, the textures of modern rock bands, as well as the intensity of really skilled acoustic players.

It's also where they cemented their bond, spontaneously forming the band after just one gig at Belmont University. Now, just over two years later, The Apache Relay has released their second album, American Nomad, a modern and young roots-rock collection produced by Nielson Hubbard.
Haim
Haim
Every once in a while there comes along an artist who restores your faith in (real) music. They capture you with familiarity. They keep you with their novelty. And all of a sudden you're energized, inspired, touched in that unexplainable way that sorta just shook the earth beneath your feet. Totally turned on.

HAIM is a band fronted by three sisters with two chaps in the back on drums and keys. They've got a deadly and powerful cocktail of impactful, raspy and emotion-laced vocals; song structures that avoid staid, expected progressions; catchy lyrics (in the good way); the stage banter of someone comfortable in their skin and sense of humor; and mega-solos. Vocal interplay and harmonies that only sisters can truly pull off, and a show with so much energy, it’s impossible not to be transfixed.
Reggie Watts as Emcee
Reggie Watts as Emcee
Hilarious, brilliant, unpredictable – comedian/musician Reggie Watts is a staple of the international performance scene. Reggie's improvised musical sets are created on-the-spot using only his formidable voice and a looping machine. No two songs are ever the same. An avowed "disinformationist," Reggie loves to disorientate his audiences in the most entertaining way. You may not know what Reggie is going to do, but that's okay – he doesn't either.
He has played sold-out solo runs at Fusebox, SXSW, Bonnaroo, Soho Theatre (London), Brian Eno's Luminous Festival at the Sydney Opera House, Montreal Comedy Festival, PopTech!, Vancouver Comedy Festival, Bumbershoot, Sydney Festival, Outside Lands Festival and cities throughout the world including Amsterdam, Paris, Cologne, Madrid, Stockholm, Copenhagen, Melbourne, Cape Town and Rekjavik, among others. Reggie recently received the ARGUS ANGEL AWARD 2010 In Recognition Of Artistic Excellence at the Brighton Festival. In New York, Reggie regularly performs at The Box, UCB, Comix, the Bellhouse, Slipper Room, Caroline's, Union Hall and Moonwork. Reggie also received the ECNY Award (2009) and Andy Kaufmann Award (2006) for his brand of innovative stand-up performance.
Venue Information:
Eastern Promenade
East End, Munjoy Hill
Portland, Maine