State Theatre Portland
Mumford & Sons, Eastern Promenade


Mumford & Sons

Eastern Promenade

Dropkick Murphys, St. Vincent, Dawes, Maccabees, the Apache Relay, Haim, Reggie Watts as Emcee

Sat, August 4, 2012

Doors: 12:00 pm / Show: 2:00 pm

Eastern Promenade

Portland, Maine


Sold Out

This event is all ages

The Box Office and will call willl be located on the Eastern Promenade, in between Moody and Wilson Streets. Box Office will open at 11am on August 4 and will remain open for the duration of the concert. Valid photo ID is required to pick up will call tickets. The Eastern Promenade is a 68-acre grassy reserve sloping down to the peaceful waters and islands of Casco Bay. The park is located on the East End of Portland in the Munjoy Hill Neighborhood. Gates for the August 4th concert will open at Noon and music will start at 2pm. Day of show Box Office and Will Call will be located at the main entrance where Wilson Street meets the Eastern Promenade. Box Office will open at 11am day of show. Parking is limited, so please carpool, bike or walk. No lawn chairs, pets, bottles, cans, glass, coolers, food, drinks, alcoholic beverages or fireworks. This is a no smoking venue per Maine state law. Dates, times & artists subject to change.

Mumford & Sons
Mumford & Sons
Portland, Maine: Lighthouses. Lobster traps. Grizzled dudes with manly beards setting sail at ungodly hours in the freezing cold. What better place to begin an American adventure than New England?

The Stopovers combine the intimacy of a community celebration with the excitement of a world-class music festival. Featuring local vendors and activities, each Stopover will begin with a concert at a unique site and end with a series of smaller events involving local businesses, venues, and, most importantly, local people. Mumford & Sons will headline the main event, alongside an eclectic and energetic roster of artists curated by the band themselves.

These one-day, outdoor events will take place in four carefully-selected and unique locations across America, including the Eastern Promenade in Portland, ME; downtown Bristol, VA/TN; Page Park in Dixon, IL; and the legendary Fairgrounds in Monterey, CA.

Tickets go on sale June 1 at 10am EST, exclusively at or by calling 1-800-512-SHOW.

Tickets to the Stopovers will be $69, with no additional service fees or hidden charges. A very limited quantity of $59 tickets with no additional fees or charges will be available beginning June 1 for the Portland concert on a first-come, first-served basis. These tickets will sell out so please plan accordingly.

Each ticket will include a beautifully designed commemorative passport ticket, and an exclusive compilation album featuring performances taken from across the four shows.
Eastern Promenade
Eastern Promenade
The Eastern Promenade is a 68-acre grassy reserve sloping down to the peaceful waters and islands of Casco Bay. The picturesque New England views here are some of the most beautiful in the world. The park is located on the East End of Portland in the Munjoy Hill Neighborhood.
Dropkick Murphys
Dropkick Murphys
On their seventh full-length studio album, Going Out In Style, Dropkick Murphys throw a new kind of party. It’s a raucous and rollicking romp overflowing with punk rock energy, folk soul, and Irish spirit. Fueled by fiery riffs and unforgettable choruses, Going Out In Style traces the journey of Cornelius Larkin, whether it’s the Irish immigrant’s first person account of his own wake or the band’s in depth interpretation of his life and lineage throughout the album’s lyrics, it’s the party to end all parties.

Dropkick Murphys have many reasons to celebrate. Since they first hit the scene in 1996, the Boston seven-piece have racked up record sales in excess of 3 million worldwide. Their smash hit single “I’m Shipping Up to Boston” exceeded platinum status and was featured in Martin Scorsese’s Academy Award-winning film, The Departed. Their 2007 offering, The Meanest of Times, debuted in the Billboard Top 20, marking the band’s highest chart entry to date and heralding the formal arrival of their independent label Born & Bred Records. The band has sold out shows worldwide and cultivated one of the most fervent fan bases in rock music. They even penned the theme song to the first Red Sox World Series win in 86 years. Going Out In Style, their latest on Born & Bred Records, is an opus that’s both explosive and endearing.
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
It starts with the creation myth: St. Vincent, naked and alone in the wilderness, startled as the ominous rattle of a snake breaks the silence of her Eden. She realizes she’s not alone in the world and breaks into a run, headed towards the uncertainty of the future. It’s a lovely and appropriate metaphor to open St. Vincent’s self-titled fourth album, except that it literally happened.
“It’s not a metaphor at all,” St. Vincent, aka Annie Clark, says of the album’s lead track, “Rattlesnake.” While visiting a friend’s west Texas ranch, she decided to strip away her clothes and fully enjoy the solitude that city life so rarely affords. “I went walking around this great expanse of land. There was no one around so I decided to take my clothes off and immerse myself in nature. I saw holes in the path, but did not put two-and-two together until I heard the rattle and caught a glimpse of the snake.”

Clark’s been moving at a breakneck speed for the past two years, barely stopping to catch her breath amidst a whirlwind of recording and touring. In 2011 she released her third album, ‘Strange Mercy,’ called “one of the year’s best” by the New York Times and “something to behold” by Pitchfork. The record cemented her status as one of her generation’s most fearsome and inventive guitarists, earned her the covers of SPIN, Paper, and Under the Radar, performances everywhere from the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Fallon to Letterman and Conan, and a year-long sold-out tour of her biggest venues to date around the world. She appeared on the hit IFC series Portlandia and graced the pages of Vogue’s coveted September issue. It was during this already monumentally busy time that she completed work with David Byrne on their collaborative album ‘Love This Giant,’ another critical smash that was dubbed “marvelous” by the New Yorker and “magical” by NPR.

“I finished the ‘Strange Mercy’ tour in Japan and went directly into ‘Love This Giant’ rehearsals and the subsequent North American tour,” says Clark.

At the end of it all, Clark made it clear to everyone in her life, in no uncertain terms, that she needed two weeks to decompress and readjust to life off the road. Time without interruption, without thoughts of albums or tours or festivals or studios. “36 hours later I sent everyone an email saying, ‘I’m ready to go again,’” Clark laughs. “I began writing music.”
Those songs turned into her most lyrically sophisticated and musically diverse collection to date, meshing distorted, aggressive electric guitars and bold vocal and synthesizer arrangements on top of a relentless rhythm section.

“I wanted the groove to be paramount,” Clark says of the album, which she arranged and demoed extensively in Austin before heading into the studio in Dallas to record. She enlisted Dap-Kings drummer Homer Steinweiss and frequent collaborator McKenzie Smith of Midlake to share drum duties, while she returned to producer John Congleton to take the sonic potential they’d only just begun to tap with ‘Strange Mercy’ into dramatic new territory. “I wanted to make a party record you could play at a funeral.”

The result is Clark’s most gripping work to date. “Bring Me Your Loves” is a frenzied freakout, but even less frantic tracks like “Severed Crossed Fingers” still deliver her trademark blend of the beautiful and surreal. At the heart of all her music, though, lie larger questions about what it means to be human and the ways in which we seek to create meaning in our lives.
“Regret” catches her at a moment of immense vulnerability, while “I Prefer Your Love” may be the purest expression of affection she’s ever written. “Digital Witness” tackles identity in the era of Instagram, with Clark singing, “If I can’t show it / If you can’t see me / What’s the point of doing anything”

“We are inundated with technology that makes us perpetual spectators,” says Clark. “It’s not enough to just experience life, we have to document it and show it to other people in order to validate our existence.” Clark is quick to admit that she, too, at times falls victim to the impulse, which is part of what fascinates her so much with the idea. “Lyrically, I’m always so interested in how complicated people are and the notion of true ambivalence,” she says. “Literally, ambi-valence. Two ways at the same time.”

Such is the music on ‘St. Vincent’: charming and alarming, gorgeous and morbid, comforting and uncanny. Four albums into one of music’s most compelling careers, Annie Clark is as “ambi-valent” as ever, and she’s not slowing down any time soon.
"And may all your favorite bands stay together," sings Taylor Goldsmith on the title track to Dawes' fourth album, All Your Favorite Bands, on their own HUB Records, harking back to a time when that very special rock group helped define who you were, expressing the joy and passion the foursome put into the release.
"Your favorite band can identify you, express how you see yourself," explains Goldsmith, who co-wrote the song with Jonny Fritz and is the sole author of the album's other eight tracks. "They enable you to articulate your feelings through the way they play their instruments and the lyrics."
On All Your Favorite Bands, Dawes manage to transcend their well-documented Southern California influences to establish their own sound and themes, which range from the glass half full optimism of the first single, "Things Happen" and the minor-chord tension of "I Can't Think About It Now" (featuring background vocals from Gillian Welch and the McCrary Sisters) to the soulful gospel of "Waiting for Your Call," the rocking tongue-in-cheek lyrics of "Right On Time" and the epic, Dylan-esque set piece, "Now That It's Too Late, Maria."
Produced by David Rawlings (Dave Rawlings Machine, Gillian Welch, Robyn Hitchcock, Old Crow Medicine Show, Willie Watson) at Woodland Sound Studios in Nashville, Dawes recorded these new songs after they had already been road-tested in front of live audiences in intimate venues from Sonoma to Santa Barbara, with Rawlings in tow. The producer even played guitar solos on two of the tracks (including that jangling noir Epiphone acoustic on "Somewhere Along the Way"), with Richard Bennett on acoustic guitar and Paul Franklin on pedal steel, also contributing.
"We played and recorded the songs as a band, with very few overdubs," explains Taylor. "It was a real joy to work with Dave, who is such an incredible musician with a deep understanding of what goes into a song. We found ourselves immediately speaking a language we both understood."
Rawlings originally jammed with the band when they were Simon Dawes in their North Hills, CA, rehearsal space around seven years ago, then joined the group on one memorable occasion at the tiny Crepe Place in Santa Cruz for a raucous encore after one of his own shows down the street. Dave threw his hat in the ring to produce them, mutually agreeing on the goal of making their recordings sound more like they do live.
"I was always a big supporter of the way they went about things, and how hard they worked," said Rawlings. "I was also impressed with their growth as musicians."
The pairing of Dawes with Rawlings couldn't have been a more perfect match of band and producer.
"Playing these songs with them in a live setting in front of an audience before we ever set foot in the studio was a lot of fun," enthused Rawlings. "I was really pleased to see the new material not just holding its own with the older stuff, but in some cases sound even better and fresher."
Fresh from his game-changing experience working on the New Basement Tapes with producer T Bone Burnett and bandmates Marcus Mumford, Elvis Costello, Jim James, Rhiannon Giddens, Taylor took the spontaneity and organic interaction of those sessions – along with a newfound self-confidence – into recording the new album.
"We didn't get super-precious about it," he said. "The rest of the band were able to react and respond in the moment, so even during the guitar solos, you can hear everyone else expressing themselves as well."
The first single, "Things Happen," is accompanied by a video that expresses Dawes' joie de vivre, a bittersweet tale of a Beatles busker (played by their actor friend Nate Michaux) who works Hollywood Blvd., where he meets fellow street performers Charlie Chaplin (Taylor), Elvis Presley (Gelber) and Marilyn Monroe (Strathairn in drag).
"In a literal way, I'm singing to a friend, but I'm also giving myself a pep talk," said Taylor. "Things might be bad, but the only thing you can do is shift your perspective to deal with it. Hoping it will go away by itself is a little unreasonable."
There are also glimpses of past relationships in "Somewhere Along the Way" and "Waiting for Your Call," while "I Can't Think About It Now" offers a disquieting view of how repressing your problems ends up making things worse, and "Right on Time" describes the serendipity that makes up a long-lasting romance, posing a dichotomy between the dramatic music and the blatantly over-the-top lyrics. The sprawling, nine-minute-plus "Now That It's Too Late Maria" was the first song the band recorded in the studio, and set the template for the album's loose-limbed, yet deliberate approach.
"Griffin played a relaxed, mid-tempo beat and I just started singing it that way," recalls Taylor. "Dave just told us not to think about what we were doing, just do it, and that's what we did. It was a very special moment for us as a band. It really set the mood and made us confident and comfortable in our own skin, helped us embrace ourselves as a band. We realized nobody could do what the four of us do together."
Making the new album helped Dawes realize just how special – and unique – they were as a unit. It's a worthy addition – and a noticeable advance – on their three previous albums, 2009's debut North Hills, 2011's Nothing Is Wrong and 2013's Stories Don't End.
"They are a tremendously talented group of guys focused solely on the music as part of their lives," offered Rawlings. "I remember sitting in the control room with Taylor and Griff as they went through their iPods and pulled out pieces of songs, swapping ideas back and forth over a great breadth of different styles from all different eras. There's a good level of passion and friction, and there was a healthy give-and-take, of questioning things, then coming to an informed decision in the studio. I certainly learned a great deal working on this album."
Taylor suggested the energy of All Your Favorite Bands matches that of their very first album, though this time the spontaneity was part of a concerted plan rather than the necessity of budgetary limitations.
"There is so much joy in these songs, they make me smile when I hear them," he concluded. "We woke up every day looking forward to the fact we would be playing together in the studio. That's all we ever care about doing."
All Your Favorite Bands is the kind of album that could well make Dawes your favorite band.
the Apache Relay
the Apache Relay
Michael Ford Jr. was a music business major when he met The Apache Relay in a Belmont University dorm. They were already deep into “a very Americana, very rootsy” sound, and before long the band was backing up Ford around campus, and soon everywhere else. Ford Jr. dropped out of college, and the group, which at the time included Mike Harris (guitar, vocals), Brett Moore (keys, guitar, mandolin), Kellen Wenrich (fiddle, keys) gigged relentlessly behind their 2009 debut 1988 and 2011’s breakthrough American Nomad. Midway through their touring in support of American Nomad Ford, Jr’s brother joined the band rounding out the group’s line up and sound. While touring in support of the album The Apache Relay found themselves opening for Mumford & Sons and hitting such festivals as Bonnaroo, Newport Folk Festival, Firefly Music Festival, Voodoo Music Experience, among others. The writing sessions for their new album, The Apache Relay, were the first time the Nashville-based group stopped to catch their breath in years. Inspired by Shelby Lynne and Richard Swift, and working with producer Kevin Augunas at Fairfax Recordings, formerly known as the famous California studio Sound City, The Apache Relay shows a band eager to push past their boundaries, and commitment to always evolving their sound.
Every once in a while there comes along an artist who restores your faith in (real) music. They capture you with familiarity. They keep you with their novelty. And all of a sudden you're energized, inspired, touched in that unexplainable way that sorta just shook the earth beneath your feet. Totally turned on.

HAIM is a band fronted by three sisters with two chaps in the back on drums and keys. They've got a deadly and powerful cocktail of impactful, raspy and emotion-laced vocals; song structures that avoid staid, expected progressions; catchy lyrics (in the good way); the stage banter of someone comfortable in their skin and sense of humor; and mega-solos. Vocal interplay and harmonies that only sisters can truly pull off, and a show with so much energy, it’s impossible not to be transfixed.
Reggie Watts as Emcee
Reggie Watts as Emcee
Hilarious, brilliant, unpredictable – comedian/musician Reggie Watts is a staple of the international performance scene. Reggie's improvised musical sets are created on-the-spot using only his formidable voice and a looping machine. No two songs are ever the same. An avowed "disinformationist," Reggie loves to disorientate his audiences in the most entertaining way. You may not know what Reggie is going to do, but that's okay – he doesn't either.
He has played sold-out solo runs at Fusebox, SXSW, Bonnaroo, Soho Theatre (London), Brian Eno's Luminous Festival at the Sydney Opera House, Montreal Comedy Festival, PopTech!, Vancouver Comedy Festival, Bumbershoot, Sydney Festival, Outside Lands Festival and cities throughout the world including Amsterdam, Paris, Cologne, Madrid, Stockholm, Copenhagen, Melbourne, Cape Town and Rekjavik, among others. Reggie recently received the ARGUS ANGEL AWARD 2010 In Recognition Of Artistic Excellence at the Brighton Festival. In New York, Reggie regularly performs at The Box, UCB, Comix, the Bellhouse, Slipper Room, Caroline's, Union Hall and Moonwork. Reggie also received the ECNY Award (2009) and Andy Kaufmann Award (2006) for his brand of innovative stand-up performance.
Venue Information:
Eastern Promenade
East End, Munjoy Hill
Portland, Maine